People like p z l s, part II.

I wrote a post a long time ago (in social media years) entitled “People like p z l s.”

Its takeaway: that too many marketers want to say everything in every communication, but that it’s more important to leave room for their intended readers to fill in the blank.

A simple, brilliant example:

2-nat-geo---wrong-father

-from the folks @ Ireland/Davenport, Johannesburg, South Africa


The story of Vivian Maier is “People like p z l s” personified.

Long story short: a quiet, unassuming, slightly odd nanny dies leaving thousands of photographic images behind. Dude finds them at an auction house, recognizes their quality, buys them, and eventually gives over his life to ensuring the artistic legacy of a woman he’s never met. And the whole art world takes notice.

Each photograph is a puzzle. Who is that? Where was it taken? What’s the context?

But there’s a meta-puzzle at play too: Who is Vivian Maier? Why did she take these photos? What’s her story? Why did she never share her talent with her friends, much less the world? Would the world have even noticed? The
questions are endless—and endlessly entertaining.

Winston Churchill once said, “Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.” Add “all wrapped up in a Moebius loop,” and you’ve got Vivian.

If you find any of the above intriguing, you must watch this:



Now ponder this meta-meta question: what if John Maloof didn’t find some old photos at an auction house?

– dp

People like p z l s, part II.

I wrote a post a long time ago (in social media years) entitled “People like p z l s.”

Its takeaway: that too many marketers want to say everything in every communication, but that it’s more important to leave room for their intended readers to fill in the blank.

A simple, brilliant example:

2-nat-geo---wrong-father

-from the folks @ Ireland/Davenport, Johannesburg, South Africa


The story of Vivian Maier is “People like p z l s” personified.

Long story short: a quiet, unassuming, slightly odd nanny dies leaving thousands of photographic images behind. Dude finds them at an auction house, recognizes their quality, buys them, and eventually gives over his life to ensuring the artistic legacy of a woman he’s never met. And the whole art world takes notice.

Each photograph is a puzzle. Who is that? Where was it taken? What’s the context?

But there’s a meta-puzzle at play too: Who is Vivian Maier? Why did she take these photos? What’s her story? Why did she never share her talent with her friends, much less the world? Would the world have even noticed? The
questions are endless—and endlessly entertaining.

Winston Churchill once said, “Russia is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.” Add “all wrapped up in a Moebius loop,” and you’ve got Vivian.

If you find any of the above intriguing, you must watch this:



Now ponder this meta-meta question: what if John Maloof didn’t find some old photos at an auction house?

– dp

DP | ME BY D.P. KNUDTEN IS LICENSED UNDER A CREATIVE COMMONS ATTRIBUTION-NONCOMMERCIAL-NO DERIVATIVE WORKS 3.0 UNITED STATES LICENCE. ALL REGISTERED TRADEMARKS ARE OWNED BY THEIR RESPECTIVE COMPANIES AND OTHER LEGAL BLATHER.